Archive

Posts Tagged ‘star cluster’

NGC 2264 The Christmas Tree Cluster

December 19, 2015 Leave a comment

NGC2264alt-800

NGC 2264 in the constellation Monoceros is sometimes called the Christmas Tree Cluster due to the vaguely triangular group of blue stars towards the top of this image with the large blue-white star S Monocertis, near the left centre of the photo, forming the base of the tree trunk. The cluster actually lies within a dense region of star-forming gas known as the Cone Nebula and you can just make out some of the pale white gas around the stars. Hydrogen alpha astronomy filters show up the surrounding gas much better in red, but here I wanted to focus on the star cluster itself.

The cluster was first discovered by William Herschel in 1784 and at magnitude 4.5 some of the stars are visible with the naked eye, but the cluster really pops out with 8x binoculars and even more with a 3″-4″ telescope.

Image taken 19/12/15 3.21am New Mexico time with iTelescope.net T3. 1 x 300 sec Colour. RA: 06h 40m 59.9s DEC: 09° 54′ 00″ (J2000). Processed with Maxim DL5 and Photoshop CS2.

 

Advertisements

Venus with the Pleiades and Hyades Open Star Clusters 14th April 2015

April 14, 2015 Leave a comment

m45venus1--5Click Image to Enlarge

I couldn’t resist another go at Venus passing the Pleiades cluster tonight, but this time I took a wider view and included the Hyades open cluster too. The Hyades is the V of stars to the left with the much closer red giant star Aldebaran glowing brightly at the top of the V. The Hyades cluster is about 625 million years old and the nearest open cluster to the solar system. Please click on the image to enlarge it as the small image above is heavily compressed by WordPress.

Image taken 14/4/15 20.27 UTC+1 Sony RX 100, ISO 1600, f.4.9, 37mm, 2.5 sec Luminance x 11. Stacked in Deepskystacker 3. Processed in Photoshop CS2.

Venus and the Pleiades Cluster 12th April 2015

April 12, 2015 Leave a comment

IMG_0328web2

Dashed out into the back garden just before 9pm to catch this lovely close encounter between Venus and the Pleiades open star cluster (M45) low in the west at 9.02pm. A close conjunction like this occurs every eight years in mid April. Image taken with a Canon 350d and Tamron LD DI 70-300mm zoom lens at 70mm (then cropped) ISO 400 3.2 seconds.

Star Cluster NGC 6603 in the M24 Small Sagittarius Star Cloud

There’s nothing particularly impressive or image worthy happening on the Sun at the moment so instead of concentrating on our own star I thought I would show you a few thousand ! The bright knot of stars at the centre of the image below is the open star cluster NGC 6603 buried deep in the heart of the brightest part of the M24 Small Sagittarius Star Cloud, close to the centre of our galaxy.

NGC-6603-stackedalt

NGC 6603 was discovered by John Herschel around 1825-33 and includes 30 stars with an approximate age of 200 million years. The component stars shine at magnitude 11 or 12 and the larger stars dotted around its location in the foreground are magnitude 6.5 – 7.5. The surrounding star cloud as a whole is aged between 200 and 600 million years old. Lets take a closer look at the NGC 6603 cluster………

NGC 6603 cropped There’s a lovely chain of stars in the cluster heading towards the top right of centre.

Image taken 28/3/15 4.56am New Mexico time 10.56am UT on iTelescope T3 (Tak TOA 150, SBIG ST-8300C) RA: 18h 18m 24.1s DEC: -18° 24′ 00″ (J2000)