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Posts Tagged ‘atlas’

Comet C/2019 Y4 (Atlas) – now in colour!

I popped back to iTelescope T14 remotely yesterday and took a series of luminance and RGB exposures of Comet C/2019 Y4 as it passess through the constellation Camelopardis. I wanted to try out the Astro Pixel Processor software with LRGB combining for the first time having run through the excellent tutorial by Christian Sasse. I think there were some stages in the processing workflow where I missed a few tricks, but overall I was quite pleased with the final product for a first attempt.

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iTelescope T14, Tak106, SBIG Universal camera. Mayhill, New Mexico 31/3/20 00:15-00:45 UTC-6. 10 x 60 sec Lum, 2 x 60 sec each R,G,B Bin 1. Processed in Astro Pixel Processor and Photoshop Elements 2018

Comet C/2019 Y4 (Atlas)

March 29, 2020 1 comment

Comet C/2019 Y4 (Atlas) is fast approaching for a meltdown rendezvous with the Sun at its closest approach around 31st May 2019 when it may brighten to magnitude -1 and will be visible to the naked eye. It is currently magnitude 8 and passing between the constellations Ursa Major and Camelopardis. It may be the brightest comet we have seen for a while and is worth keeping track of. At the moment you can only see it with a larger telescope and some imaging to bring out the detail in the bright surrounding coma and short tail.

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Above: Comet C/2019 Y4 (Atlas) at centre of photo passing the 5.3 magnitude G7IIb star HIP40215 (top right of comet) in Ursa Major. The faint comet tail is to the bottom right. Image taken 23.45-12.00 28/3/19 Mayhill, New Mexico, USA UTC -6. T14 Tak FSQ ED 106, SBIG Universal camera 7×60 seconds Lum. Processed in Deepskystacker and Photoshop Elements with Astro Tools

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Above: A view of the projected path of Comet C/2019 Y4 through the Solar System in the next few months.

Categories: Comets Tags: , , ,

Kaguya Lunar Atlas

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I first bought a copy of this book back in 2011 when it was published. Since then, and thanks largely to the accompanying text, it has been a constant companion in my lunar library. The book presents good quality HDTV images from the camera onboard the SELENE (more commonly known by its Japanese nickname Kaguya ) orbiter. Kaguya was launched in September 2007 and after a number of successful orbits it was deliberately crashed into the lunar surface in June 2009. It’s two 2.2 megapixel CCD HDTV cameras, one wide-angle and one telephoto, along with a terrain and multi-band imager, sent back some fantastic high resolution images. The book uses the HDTV images along with descriptive text of the features to give you a good primer on the typical features you will see and explains their formation and origins. The book openly encourages you to interpret lunar features for yourself as you progress through the pages and you will find that this does quickly become possible.

The book is now out of print and secondhand copies are extremely expensive (£80 + on Amazon) . You can occasionally find some reasonably priced editions at the AddALL used and out of print books search here AddALL Books Search where I have seen copies going for £20 – £25. If you see one, snap it up, this is a fantastic book for the lunar enthusiast/planetary geologist.

Categories: Books, Lunar Tags: , , , ,